NEWS ARCHIVE - APPOINTMENTS AND RESIGNATIONS

Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs: Who Is Kevin Washburn?

Sunday, August 12, 2012
Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs: Who Is Kevin Washburn?
Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs: Who Is Kevin Washburn?
 
On August 2, 2012, President Barack Obama nominated a law professor with experience in American Indian law and gambling law to succeed Larry EchoHawk as Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs. A member of the Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma, Kevin K. Washburn has been Dean of the University of New Mexico School of Law in Albuquerque since June 2009. The nomination is subject to confirmation by the Senate.
 
Born in 1967 in Southeastern Oklahoma, Washburn earned a BA in Economics at the University of Oklahoma in 1989, attended law school at the Washington University Law School in St. Louis for one year, before transferring to Yale Law School, where he was editor-in-chief of the Yale Journal on Regulation and earned his JD in 1993. Washburn actually began his legal education at the University of New Mexico School of Law as a student at the American Indian Law Center’s Pre-law Summer Institute.
 
Pursuing a career in public service after graduating law school, Washburn served as a judicial law clerk for Judge William C. Canby, Jr., an expert in American Indian law, on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in Phoenix, Arizona, from August 1993 to July 1994. Washburn then relocated to Washington D.C., to serve as a trial attorney at the Department of Justice Environment and Natural Resources Division from 1994 to 1997. At the DOJ, Washburn successfully argued the case of Montana v. EPA, in which the Ninth Circuit upheld an Environmental Protection Agency decision to recognize the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes as a state for purposes of setting water quality standards under the Clean Water Act. Changing jobs at the DOJ, Washburn served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in the Violent Crimes Section from 1997 to 2000. During this time, Washburn also taught at UNM as an adjunct professor. Washburn’s first official foray into practicing American Indian law came when he returned to Washington to serve as general counsel at the National Indian Gaming Commission from January 2000 to July 2002.
 
Washburn began his academic career as an associate professor of law at the University of Minnesota Law School in Minneapolis, where he taught from 2002 to 2008, although he was resident in Massachusetts for the 2007–2008 academic year as the Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Associate Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He was Rosenstiel Distinguished Professor of Law at the Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona in Tucson from 2008 to 2009, where he taught contracts, criminal law, and gambling law.
 
Among his many academic publications, Washburn has listed the following as representative: The Legacy of Bryan v. Itasca County: How an Erroneous $147 County Tax Notice Helped Bring Tribes $200 Billion in Indian Gaming Revenue (2008); Restoring the Grand Jury (2008); American Indians, Crime, and the Law (2006); and Federal Criminal Law and Tribal Self-Determination (2006). He has served as a trustee on the Law School Admission Council from 2006 to present; as a member of the Ad Hoc Advisory Committee on Native American Sentencing Issues of the United States Sentencing Commission from 2002 to 2004; and as a member of the Board of Directors of the Innocence Project of Minnesota from 2002 to 2003.
 
Washburn is married to Elizabeth “Libby” Rodke Washburn, who currently serves as the state director for U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-New Mexico), and they have two children. A Democrat, Washburn has contributed $3,050 to Democratic candidates and causes, including $525 to ActBlue in 2009, $525 to Sen. Michael Bennett (D-Colorado) in 2009, and $2,000 to John Kelly’s unsuccessful campaign for Congress in New Mexico’s 1st Congressional District in 2000. Libby Washburn has contributed $1,250: $250 to Dave Obey (D-Wisconsin), who was U.S. Representative for Wisconsin’s 7th Congressional District from 1969 until 2011, in 2009, and $1,000 to Sen. Bennett in 2010.
-Matt Bewig
 
Biography (University of New Mexico School of Law)

  

 
Director of the Missile Defense Agency: Who Is James Syring?
Saturday, August 11, 2012
Director of the Missile Defense Agency: Who Is James Syring?
In the wake of the dismissal of Lieutenant General Patrick O’Reilly as head of the Missile Defense Agency for outrageously abusive conduct toward his staff, President Barack Obama has nominated Rear Admiral James D. Syring to be promoted to Vice Admiral and head the agency, which researches, develops, and tests missile defense programs. Syring takes the helm of an agency which, since its founding during the Reagan administration as the Strategic Defense Initiative, or “Star Wars” program, has had several high-profile failures and where O’Reilly’s tenure led to plummeting morale. The agency has an annual budget of $8 billion. As for O’Reilly, who is expected to leave in August, military rules require that he be demoted to major general if his departure occurs before the end of his expected four-year term in November, according to Pentagon officials.
 
Born circa 1963, James Syring hails from Muncie, Indiana, where he graduated Northside High School in 1981. He earned a BS in Marine Engineering at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, in 1985, and an MS in Mechanical Engineering from the Naval Post Graduate School in 1992.
 
Commissioned as a Navy ensign upon graduating from Annapolis, Syring was designated an engineering duty officer. At sea, he qualified as a surface warfare officer on the USS Downes (FF 1070) where he served as auxiliaries, electrical and electronics material officer. Syring served as ship superintendent for the USS Port Royal (CG 73) and Aegis test officer for the new construction DDG 51 class ships on the staff of the supervisor of Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, Mississippi, from 1992 to 1996. Continuing his work on the DDG 51 class ships, which is the Navy’s first class of destroyer built around the Aegis Combat System and the SPY-1D multifunction phased array radar, Syring was combat systems, test and trials officer in the DDG 51 Aegis Shipbuilding Program Office from 1996 to 1999 and combat systems baseline manager at the Aegis Technical Division, responsible for new construction Aegis baseline computer program development from 1999 to 2001. Syring served as director for Surface Combatants in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition, where he provided advice on acquisition issues related to several classes of ships, including the CG 47 cruisers, DDG 51 destroyers, DDG 1000 destroyers and LCS class ships from 2001 to 2003.
 
Syring served in the DDG 1000 Shipbuilding Program for the following seven years, first as technical director from 2003 to 2005, and then as program manager from 2005 to 2010. Since 2010, Syring has served as the program executive officer for Integrated Warfare Systems in the Naval Sea Systems Command.
-Matt Bewig
 
DDG 1000 Moves Forward as Budget Battles Fade (by Christopher P. Cavas, Navy Times)
 

  

 
Ambassador to Pakistan: Who Is Richard Olson?
Sunday, July 29, 2012
Ambassador to Pakistan: Who Is Richard Olson?
In the wake of the resignation of career diplomat Cameron Munter, who was a casualty of Pakistani anger over civilian deaths and U.S. covert actions there, President Obama on July 17 nominated career diplomat Richard Olson, who served as Coordinating Director for Development and Economic Affairs at the Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, from June 2011 to June 2012, to take over the embassy in Islamabad.
 
Born circa 1959, Olson earned an AB in Law & Society and History at Brown University in 1981. Joining the Foreign Service in 1982, Olson served early career assignments in Mexico, Uganda, Tunisia, Saudi Arabia (as the embassy’s liaison officer to General Norman Schwarzkopf during the 1991 Gulf War) and Ethiopia. Olson served in the United Arab Emirates, both at the embassy in Abu Dhabi from 1999 to 2001 and as U.S. consul general in Dubai from 2001 to 2003.
 
In the aftermath of the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, Olson volunteered to work with the Coalition Provisional Authority as governorate coordinator for the province of Najaf in Southern Iraq. Olson served as deputy chief of mission at the U.S. Mission to NATO in Brussels, Belgium, from 2006 to 2008, followed by service as ambassador to the United Arab Emirates from 2008 to 2011, which was his first ambassadorship.
 
Olson’s Washington assignments include service at the State Department Operations Center (twice), on the NATO Desk, at the Office of Israel and Palestine Affairs (twice, including as director), and at the Office of Iraqi Affairs, including as director.
 
Olson and wife Deborah Jones (a Foreign Service Officer who served as Ambassador to Kuwait from 2008 to 2011) have two daughters. In his spare time, Olson is an avid cyclist, and competed in the March 2011 Abu Dhabi International Triathlon (sprint).
-Matt Bewig
 

Obama Names New Afghan, Pakistan Envoys (Dawn.com, Pakistan) 

 
U.S. Army Chief of Engineers: Who Is Lt. Gen. Thomas Bostick?
Sunday, July 29, 2012
U.S. Army Chief of Engineers: Who Is Lt. Gen. Thomas Bostick?
On May 22, 2012, Lieutenant General Thomas P. Bostick became the 53rd U.S. Army Chief of Engineers and Commanding General of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). Lieutenant General Bostick serves as the senior military officer overseeing most of the nation’s civil works infrastructure and military construction. He succeeds Maj. Gen. Merdith Temple, who served as Acting Chief of Engineers from June 17, 2011 to May 22, 2012, following Lieutenant General Robert Van Antwerp, who served from 2007 to 2011.
 
Bostick was born circa 1956 to a military family, as his father retired from the Army as a Master Sergeant, one of his brothers became an Army colonel, and his father-in-law retired from the Marine Corps as a Sergeant Major. Bostick earned a BS (no major) at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1978, and an MS in both Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University in 1985. He is also a graduate of the U.S. Army War College. He has been a licensed Professional Engineer in Virginia since 1988.
 
Commissioned an Army Second Lieutenant in June 1978, Bostick served a variety of positions in the 54th Engineer Battalion in Bamberg, Germany, from October 1978 to December 1982. After two-and-a-half years of engineering study, Bostick taught mechanical engineering at West Point from June 1985 to June 1988. He then spent another year in school, this time at the United States Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, from July 1988 June 1989, followed by a year in Washington D.C., as a White House Fellow at the Department of Veterans Affairs from August 1989 to August 1990.
 
Posted back to Germany, Bostick served a year, from June 1990 to June 1991, as an Engineer Operations Staff Officer with United States Army Europe and the Seventh Army, Germany, before serving two Operations assignments with the 1st Armored Division from June 1991 to June 1993.
 
After a year as Executive Officer to the Chief of Engineers, Bostick, by this point a Lieutenant Colonel, was given command of the 1st Engineer Battalion, 1st Infantry Division (Mechanized) at Fort Riley, Kansas, where he served from June 1994 to July 1996. Following a ten-month course of study at the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, Bostick commanded the Engineer Brigade of the 1st Armored Division, from July 1997 to June 1999, including participation in peacekeeping operations in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
 
Back in Washington, Bostick served as Executive Officer to the Army Chief of Staff from June 1999 to May 2001, and as Deputy Director for Operations at the National Military Command Center from May 2001 to August 2002. He then served as Assistant Division Commander of the 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood, Texas, from August 2002 to June 2004, followed by service as USACE Director of Military Programs, with duty as Commander of the Persian Gulf Region Division, from June 2004 to July 2005. Bostick then served four years, from October 2005 to May 2009, as the Army’s top recruiter, Commanding General of the Army Recruiting Command at Fort Knox, Kentucky. After a year as Special Assistant to the Army Chief of Staff, Bostick served as Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel starting in February 2010.
 
He is married to Renée Bostick, who is an elementary school principal in Arlington, Virginia. They have one son, Joshua.
-Matt Bewig
 

Testimony before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee 

 
Ambassador to Afghanistan: Who Is James Cunningham?
Saturday, July 28, 2012
Ambassador to Afghanistan: Who Is James Cunningham?
President Barack Obama, opting for continuity as the U.S. prepares to draw down its military presence in the war torn nation of Afghanistan by the end of 2014, on July 17 nominated veteran diplomat James B. Cunningham, currently deputy Ambassador to Kabul, to succeed current Ambassador Ryan Crocker, who is retiring two years earlier than planned because of health reasons. Cunningham has been Crocker’s deputy since June 2011.
 
Born in 1952 in Allentown, Pennsylvania, Cunningham earned Bachelor’s degrees in Political Science and Psychology at Syracuse University in 1974.
 
After early postings in Stockholm, Sweden; Washington D.C.; Rome, Italy; and the U.S. Mission to NATO in Brussels, Belgium, in 1988 newly elected NATO Secretary General Manfred Woerner appointed Cunningham as deputy chief of staff, and in January 1989 as chief of staff. In that capacity, Cunningham advised Woerner during the unification of Germany and the dissolution of the Warsaw Pact and the Soviet Union.
 
Shortly after Iraq invaded Kuwait in August 1990, Cunningham became deputy political counselor at the U.S. Mission to the UN, followed by service as Director of the State Department Office of European Security and Political Affairs from 1993 to 1995. He served as Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Rome from 1996 to 1999.
 
Returning to the United Nations, Cunningham served as deputy U.S. permanent representative to the UN from 1999 to 2004, including the first nine months of 2001 as acting permanent representative. He then served his first tour in Asia, as Consul General in Hong Kong from August 2005 to July 20008, responsible for the Hong Kong and Macau Special Administrative Regions of China.
 
Cunningham’s first ambassadorship was a prominent one, as he served as Ambassador to Israel from August 2008 to June 2011, where he received high marks in a State Department Inspector General report regarding the mission in Tel Aviv.
 
Cunningham is married to Leslie Genier of Mineville, New York. They have two daughters. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Asia Society. He speaks Italian, French, and Spanish and has studied Mandarin.
-Matt Bewig
 

Our Man in Israel (by Jeffrey Pepper Rodgers, Maxwell Perspective) 

 
Acting Inspector General of the Defense Department: Who Is Lynne Halbrooks?
Saturday, July 28, 2012
Acting Inspector General of the Defense Department: Who Is Lynne Halbrooks?
Lynne Halbrooks became the Acting Inspector General for the Department of Defense on December 25, 2011, succeeding Gordon Heddell. The DoDIG is supposed to operate independently to prevent and detect fraud, waste, and abuse through audits and investigations, and is in charge of keeping the Secretary of Defense and the Congress informed about agency problems and deficiencies. In May 2012, the release of an internal report slamming the DoDIG Office’s handling of whistleblower reprisal cases provoked criticism from Congress and the media, which Halbrooks was able to partially deflect by pointing out that she had requested the report in the first place.
 
Born circa 1963 and raised in Aitken, Minnesota, Halbrooks earned a B.A. in Political Science and Philosophy at the University of Minnesota at Duluth in 1985, and earned a J.D. at Marquette Law School in 1988. After graduation, she clerked for the Minnesota Supreme Court, and worked in the Milwaukee law office of Hinshaw and Culbertson.
 
Halbrooks joined the Department of Justice in 1991 as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Eastern District of Wisconsin, where she prosecuted criminal cases and represented the government in civil litigation. She relocated to Washington D.C., to work in the Executive Office for United States Attorneys from 1993 to 2003, eventually serving as Deputy Director from 2000 to 2003. Halbrooks then joined the Legislative Branch, serving with the Sergeant at Arms in the United States Senate, first as General Counsel and later as the Deputy Sergeant at Arms, from May 2003 to January 2007. As a result of the 2006 elections, the Senate changed to Democratic control, leading to a complete change in the Sergeant at Arms office, the employees of which are political patronage positions. Halbrooks, however, was granted a soft landing by minority leader Senator Mitch McConnell (Kentucky), who appointed her as the Republican Representative to the Sergeant at Arms, a job she did from January to October 2007.
 
Halbrooks first joined the “IG community” when serving as General Counsel for the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction from October 2007 to February 2009. She joined the DoD Inspector General Office on March 1, 2009, to serve as General Counsel, which she did until she began service as Principal Deputy Inspector General on August 2, 2009.
 
Lynne Halbrooks and her husband, Kevin, live in Virginia, where she has become an avid golfer.
-Matt Bewig
 
Lynne Halbrooks (Marquette Lawyer)

Acting Pentagon IG Answers Critics of Record on Whistleblowers (by Charles S. Clark, Government Executive) 

 
Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA): Who Is Arati Prabhakar?
Wednesday, July 18, 2012
Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA): Who Is Arati Prabhakar?
Hoping to move beyond the conflict of interest controversy that torpedoed the tenure of outgoing director Regina Dugan, the Obama administration has named a new director for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Dugan resigned in March over revelations that her family firm, RedXDefense, won $400,000 in Darpa contracts while Dugan was director—and while the company owed her about $250,000.
 
Dr. Arati Prabhakar, who starts her new position at Darpa on July 30, was born in 1959 in New Delhi, India. She came to the U.S. at the age of 3 with her mother, who was seeking a graduate degree in social work at the University of Chicago. When she was 7, the family moved to Lubbock, Texas, where she grew up. She earned a B.S. in Electrical Engineering at nearby Texas Tech University in 1979, and an M.S. in Electrical Engineering and a Ph.D. in Applied Physics at the California Institute of Technology in 1980 and 1984, respectively. The first woman to win a Ph.D. in applied physics at Caltech, Prabhakar’s doctoral dissertation was entitled, “Investigation of Deep Level Defects in Semiconductor Material Systems.”
 
More interested in exploring the policy implications of science than engaging in research, Prabhakar went to Washington, DC, in 1984 on a Congressional fellowship with the Office of Technology Assessment, where she wrote on microelectronics research and development. She then served at DARPA from 1986 to 1993, first as a program manager and then as founding director of the Microelectronics Technology Office. In May 1993, at the age of 34, Prabhakar became director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, an agency traditionally involved in defining technical standards, but which the Clinton administration wanted to use to encourage high-tech economic development.
 
Prabhakar left public service for the private sector in 1997 by joining Raychem, a publicly held specialty materials company, as senior vice president and chief technology officer. She was subsequently with Interval Research Corporation, a laboratory for consumer technology, as vice president and then president. In 2001, Prabhakar became a partner at U.S. Venture Partners (USVP), a venture capital firm in Menlo Park, California, where she worked with new high tech companies.
 
USVP was a primary investor in solar panel maker Solyndra, whose failure after receiving loan guarantees from the Obama Energy Department raised questions about the influence of prominent campaign contributors. According to the Wall Street Journal, it’s “unclear whether Prabhakar was directly involved with the firm’s Solyndra stake,” although Wired magazine recently quoted an unnamed senior defense official saying that “Dr. Prabakhar…had no involvement in the federal loan guarantee for Solyndra and wasn’t involved in the restructuring of the loan.”
 
Prabhakar chairs the Efficiency and Renewables Advisory Committee for the U.S. Department of Energy, is a member of the National Academies Science Technology and Economic Policy board, a member of the College of Engineering Advisory Board at UC Berkeley, and a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. She serves on the board of directors of SRI International, a nonprofit research institute, and either serves or has served on the boards of Kilopass Technology, Inc., SiBEAM, Inc., Lightspeed Logic, Inc., NanoSolar, Inc., Arradiance, Inc., Kleer Corporation, and Pivotal Systems Corp.
 
A finance industry Democrat, Prabhakar has made political contributions totaling $12,586 since 2003, about two-thirds of it ($8,636) to the National Venture Capital Association PAC, which funnels money to Democratic and Republican candidates about equally. Prabhakar also contributed $500 to Sen. Joe Lieberman’s (Ind.-Connecticut) Senate campaign in 2003, $1,000 to Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential run and $2,200 to Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign.
-Matt Bewig
 
 
Ambassador from Malaysia: Who Is Othman Hashim?
Saturday, July 14, 2012
Ambassador from Malaysia: Who Is Othman Hashim?
The Southeast Asian nation of Malaysia has sent a career diplomat to serve as its next ambassador to the United States, replacing a political appointee, Datuk Seri Dr. Jamaluddin Jarjis, who served in Washington for two-and-a-half years. (“Datuk” and “Datuk Seri” are honorific titles bestowed by the Malaysian government.) Datuk Othman Hashim, who presented his credentials to President Obama on May 2, 2012, has made attracting more American investment in Malaysia one of his main goals. In 2011, U.S. imports from Malaysia came to $25.7 billion, with semiconductors, computer parts and telecommunications equipment accounting for half the total. U.S. exports to Malaysia totaled $14.2 billion, yielding a trade deficit of $11.5 billion.
 
Born circa 1934, Othman is a career member of Malaysia’s Foreign Service. In 1994 he was U.N. resident coordinator and representative of the United Nations Development Program in Palestine. He then served as counselor and deputy head of mission at the Malaysian embassy in Beijing, China. He was ambassador to the Czech Republic circa 2003; deputy secretary-general at the Malaysian Foreign Ministry; and Malaysia’s permanent representative to the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, from January 2009 until March 2012. Othman was said to be the only diplomat considered to replace Dr. Jamaluddin, who will serve as special envoy to the U.S. while retaining his ministerial rank.
 
Othman is married to Datin Rohayazam Kamaruzaman. They had three children, one of whom, Firdhaus, died in a car accident in Kuala Lampur in 2008.
-Matt Bewig
 
Othman Picked as Envoy to US (by Paul Gabriel, The Star-Malaysia)
 
Ambassador to Serbia: Who Is Michael Kirby?
Sunday, July 08, 2012
Ambassador to Serbia: Who Is Michael Kirby?
A career diplomat who has served mainly in Eastern Europe is President Obama’s nominee to be the next ambassador to Serbia, the Balkan nation with which the U.S. has had sometimes tense relations since the breakup of Yugoslavia began in the early 1990s. One of four children born to parents Richard N. and Dolores (Senkfor) Kirby, Michael David Kirby was born circa 1954. He was likely inspired to pursue a Foreign Service career by the example of his father, a Foreign Service officer who, among other postings, was consul general in Hong Kong in 1963.
 
Michael Kirby earned a B.A. in History at the University of Pennsylvania in 1976 and then studied at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. A career consular officer who joined the Foreign Service circa 1979, Kirby served early career assignments at the U.S. embassies in Copenhagen, Denmark; Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; and Georgetown, Guyana; and at State Department Headquarters as a desk officer in the Office of Caribbean Affairs. In Tanzania and Guyana, Kirby served as vice consul.
 
Continuing on that career path, Kirby served as consul at the Consulate General in Krakow, Poland, from 1988 to 1991, and as regional consular officer at the Consulate General in Frankfurt, Germany, from 1996 to 1998, supervising consular operations at U.S. embassies in the countries of the former Soviet Union except Russia.
 
 Returning stateside, he served as director of the Office of Intelligence Coordination at the State Department from 1999 to 2001. Back overseas, Kirby was consul general at the embassy in Warsaw from 2001 to 2004, and consul general at the embassy in Seoul, South Korea, the State Department’s largest non-immigrant visa post, from 2004 to 2006.
 
Kirby was then appointed to his first ambassadorship in September 2006, serving as ambassador at the embassy in Chişinău, Moldova, from September 2006 to May 2008. He became the principal deputy assistant secretary for consular affairs in June 2008, when he almost immediately confronted with the embarrassing revelation that some State Department employees had been improperly accessing the passport files of various celebrities. More recently, in June 2010, Kirby was involved in the decision to recognize gender change on U.S. passports.
 
Michael Kirby is married to Sara Powelson Kirby and has two daughters, Katherine and Elizabeth.
-Matt Bewig
 
 
Ambassador from Singapore: Who Is Ashok Mirpuri?
Saturday, July 07, 2012
Ambassador from Singapore: Who Is Ashok Mirpuri?
The new ambassador from the Southeast Asian city-state of Singapore is an experienced diplomat with no prior postings in the Western Hemisphere. Set to begin his posting on July 23, 2012, Ashok Kumar Mirpuri succeeds Chan Heng Chee, who served as Singapore’s ambassador to Washington from July 1996 to June 2012.
 
Born December 13, 1959, Ashok Mirpuri earned a Bachelor of Social Science degree in Political Science at the National University of Singapore in 1984 and an M.A. at the University of London School of Oriental & African Studies in 1992.
 
Mirpuri joined the Singapore Ministry of Foreign Affairs in May 1984. He served his first overseas posting as first secretary (political) at the Singapore Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia, from 1987 to 1991. Mirpuri served in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Policy Planning & Analysis Directorate I (South East Asia) from 1992 to 1996, including service asdDirector starting in 1994.
 
In 1997, Mirpuri was detailed to Shell International Ltd in the United Kingdom as corporate advisor for the Asia Pacific region. He returned to Jakarta to serve as minister-counselor and deputy chief of mission at the embassy from March 1998 to June 2000.
 
Mirpuri received his first ambassadorship in July 2000, serving as high commissioner to Australia from July 3, 2000 to June 2002, and as high commissioner to Malaysia from July 2002 to June 2006. The title “High Commissioner” is used by countries that belong to the Commonwealth of Nations, like Singapore, for its ambassadors to other Commonwealth countries. Mirpuri served as ambassador to Indonesia from July 2006 to June 2012.
 
Mirpuri, a keen golfer, is married to Gouri Uppal. They have a daughter and a son.
-Matt Bewig
 
Gouri Mirpuri: More Than the Ambassador’s Wife (by Lin Neumann, Jakarta Globe)
 
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